Paper $41.00 ISBN: 9780226468365 Published May 1999
Cloth $94.00 ISBN: 9780226468358 Published July 1999

The Cultural Territories of Race

Black and White Boundaries

Edited by Michèle Lamont

The Cultural Territories of Race

Edited by Michèle Lamont

With an Introduction by Michèle Lamont  Joint publication with Russell Sage Foundation
436 pages | 6 x 9 | © 1999
Paper $41.00 ISBN: 9780226468365 Published May 1999
Cloth $94.00 ISBN: 9780226468358 Published July 1999
Even as America becomes more multiracial, the black-white divide remains central to understanding many patterns and tensions in contemporary society. Since the 1960s, however, social scientists concerned with this topic have been reluctant to discuss the cultural dimensions of racial inequality—not wanting to "blame the victim" for having "wrong values." The Cultural Territories of Race redirects this research tendency, employing today’s more sophisticated methods of cultural analysis toward a new understanding of how cultural structures articulate the black/white problem.

These essays examine the cultural territories of race through topics such as blacks’ strategies for dealing with racism, public categories for definition of race, and definitions of rules for cultural memberships. Empirically grounded, these studies analyze divisions among blacks according to their relationships with whites or with alternative black culture; differences among whites regarding their attitudes toward blacks; and differences both among blacks and between blacks and whites, in their cultural understandings of various aspects of social life ranging from material success to marital life and to ideas about feminism. The essays teach us about the largely underexamined cultural universes of black executives, upwardly mobile college students, fast-food industry workers, so-called deadbeat dads, and proponents of Afrocentric curricula.

The Cultural Territories of Race makes an important contribution to current policy debates by amplifying muted voices that have too often been ignored by other social scientists.

Contributors are: Elijah Anderson, Amy Binder, Bethany Bryson, Michael C. Dawson, Catherine Ellis, Herbert J. Gans, Jennifer L. Hochschild, Michèle Lamont, Jane J. Mansbridge, Katherine S. Newman, Maureen R. Waller, Pamela Barnhouse Walters, Mary C. Waters, Julia Wrigley, Alford A. Young Jr.
Contents
Acknowledgments
Introduction: Beyond Taking Culture Seriously
MICHELE LAMONT

part one: dealing with racism

The Social Situation of the Black Executive: Black and White Identities in the Corporate World
ELIJAH ANDERSON

Navigating Race: Getting Ahead in the Lives of "Rags to Riches" Young Black Men
ALFORD A. YOUNG JR.

Explaining the Comfort Factor: West Indian Immigrants Confront American Race Relations
MARY C. WATERS

Is Racial Oppression Intrinsic to Domestic Work? The Experiences of Children's Caregivers in Contemporary America
JULIA WRIGLEY

part two: class and culture

Above "People Above"? Status and Worth among White and Black Workers
MICHELE LAMONT

"There's No Shame in My Game": Status and Stigma among Harlem's Working Poor
KATHERINE S. NEWMAN AND CATHERINE ELLIS

Meanings and Motives in New Family Stories: The Separation of Reproduction and Marriage among Low-Income Black and White Parents
MAUREEN R. WALLER

part three: education and the politics of race

Friend and Foe: Boundary Work and Collective Identity in the Afrocentric and Multicultural Curriculum Movements in American Public Education
AMY BINDER

Multiculturalism as a Moving Moral Boundary: Literature Professors Redefine Racism
BETHANY BRYSON

Education and Advancement: Exploring the Hopes and Dreams of Blacks and Poor Whites at the Turn of the Century
PAMELA BARNHOUSE WALTERS

part four: Ideology and the politics of race

"You're Too Independent!": How Gender, Race, and Class Make Many Plural Feminisms
JANE J. MANSBRIDGE

"Dis Beat Disrupts": Rap, Ideology, and Black Political Attitudes
MICHAEL C. DAWSON

Affirmative Action as Culture War
JENNIFER L. HOCHSCHILD

epilogue: the future of racial classificatlon

The Possibility of a New Racial Hierarchy in the Twenty-First-Century United States
HERBERT J. GANS

About the Contributors
Index
 
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