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Distributed for University of British Columbia Press

What We Learned

Two Generations Reflect on Tsimshian Education and the Day Schools

Distributed for University of British Columbia Press

What We Learned

Two Generations Reflect on Tsimshian Education and the Day Schools

The legacy of residential schools has haunted Canadians, yet little is known about the day and public schools where most Indigenous children were sent to be educated. In What We Learned, two generations of Tsimshian students – elders born in the 1930s and 1940s and middle-aged adults born in the 1950s and 1960s – add their recollections of attending day schools in northwestern British Columbia to contemporary discussions of Indigenous schooling in Canada. Their stories also invite readers to consider traditional Indigenous views of education that conceive of learning as a lifelong experience that takes place across multiple contexts.

224 pages


Table of Contents

Foreword / James McDonald

1 A Class List and a Puzzle: Researching Indigenous Schooling and Education

2 Indigenous Schooling as Assimilation: From Segregation to Integration

3 Tsimshian Education versus Western-Style Schooling

4 Walking on Two Paths: Education and Schooling at Port Essington among the Pre-1950s Generation

5 Buried Seeds Taking Root: Dispossession and Resurgence at Terrace among the Post-1950s Generation

6 Stability and Change: Tsimshian Education and Schooling across Time and Place

Epilogue

Notes;Bibliography; Index

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