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Distributed for University of British Columbia Press

Voices Raised in Protest

Defending North American Citizens of Japanese Ancestry, 1942-49

Distributed for University of British Columbia Press

Voices Raised in Protest

Defending North American Citizens of Japanese Ancestry, 1942-49

In this timely book, Stephanie Bangarth studies the efforts and discourse of anti-internment advocates, and discusses the various cases they brought before the courts, as well as the arguements Japanese Canadians raised in their own defence. These critiques of the governement’s removal and deportation policies were seminal examples of a growing general interest in civil rights, and would provide a foundation for rights activism in subsequent years. This book offers valuable perspective for today’s debates over ethnic and racial profiling, treatment of "enemy combatants," and tensions between civil-liberty and security imperatives.


296 pages


Table of Contents

Introduction

1 A Practicable Coincidence of Policies?

2 The CCJC and the ACLU: Engaging Debate, 1942-1946

3 "Dear Friend": Advocacy Expanded

4 Advancing Their Rights: Minorities and Advocacy

5 "The war is over. Long live the war!" Legal Battles to Obtain Justice during and after the Second World War

6 Conclusion: "They Made Democracy Work"

Afterword

Appendices

Notes

Bibliography

Index

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