Skip to main content

Distributed for University of British Columbia Press

Tibet and Nationalist China’s Frontier

Intrigues and Ethnopolitics, 1928-49

In this ground-breaking study, Hsiao Ting Lin demonstrates that the Chinese frontier was the subject neither of concerted aggression on the part of a centralized and indoctrinated Chinese government nor of an ideologically driven nationalist ethnopolitics. Instead, Nationalist sovereignty over Tibet and other border regions was the result of rhetorical grandstanding by Chiang Kai-shek and his regime. Tibet and Nationalist China’s Frontier makes a crucial contribution to the understanding of past and present China-Tibet relations. A counterpoint to erroneous historical assumptions, this book will change the way Tibetologists and modern Chinese historians frame future studies of the region.

Table of Contents

Preface

Part 1: The Setting

1 The Nationalist Government, National Image, and Territorial Fragmentation in the Prewar Decade (1928-37)

2 The Professed Policy, the Policy Planners, and the Imagined Sovereignty

Part 2: The Prewar Decade, 1928-37

3 The Unquiet Southwestern Borderlands

4 The Mission to Tibet

5 The ‘Commissioner’ Politics

Part 3: The Wartime Period, 1938-1945

6 Building a Nationalist-controlled State in Southwest China

7 The Issue of China-India Roadway via Tibet

8 Rhetoric and Reality in Wartime China’s Tibetan Concerns

Part 4: The Postwar Period, 1945-49

9 Postwar Frontier Planning vis-à-vis non-Han Separatist Movements

10 The Sera Monastery Incident

Epilogue

Notes

Bibliography

Index

Be the first to know

Get the latest updates on new releases, special offers, and media highlights when you subscribe to our email lists!

Sign up here for updates about the Press