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Distributed for University of British Columbia Press

Smokeless Sugar

The Death of a Provincial Bureaucrat and the Construction of China’s National Economy

Distributed for University of British Columbia Press

Smokeless Sugar

The Death of a Provincial Bureaucrat and the Construction of China’s National Economy

Part history, part biography, and part mystery story, Smokeless Sugar traces the formation of a national economy in China through an intriguing investigation of the 1936 execution of an allegedly corrupt Cantonese official. Feng Rui, a Western-educated agricultural expert, introduced modern sugar milling to China in the 1930s as a key component in a provincial investment program. Before long, however, he was accused of colluding with smugglers to pass foreign sugar off as a domestic product. Emily Hill makes the case that Feng was, in fact, a scapegoat in a multi-sided power struggle in which political leaders vied with commercial players for access to China's markets and tax revenues.

Table of Contents

Introduction

1 The Formation of Agricultural Expertise: Feng Rui’s Education and Early Career

2 Public Service in Guangdong, 1931-36: Economic Nationalism and Provincial Planning

3  Rice and Revenue: Guangdong’s "Benefit Agriculture" Import Taxes

4 White Sugar: Global Business and Provincial Enterprises

5 Bitter Experiences with Sugarcane

6 Brokers, Smugglers, and the Official Sugar Monopoly, 1934-36

7 National Reunification and the Punishment of Feng Rui

8 Provincial Sugar Industry Programs, 1945-58

Conclusion: Shaping China’s Economic Nation on the Eve of War

Notes

Bibliography

Index

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