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Distributed for Hirmer Publishers

Schlüter in Berlin

A City Guide

Andreas Schlüter (1659–1714) was a well-known Baroque sculptor and the architect behind some of Berlin’s most famous buildings, from the legendary Amber Room to the City Palace—which is in the midst of a major rebuilding effort. In his role as court sculptor and court architect, Schlüter worked under the direction of Frederick I of Prussia, who hoped to position the city through ambitious new art and architectural projects alongside Paris and Rome as a chief artistic center of Europe.
           
The perfect companion for those planning a trip to the city or interested in this particularly rich period of its architectural history, Schlüter In Berlin: A City Guide takes readers through all of the architect’s most famous works with illustrations and convenient city maps. Each sculpture or building is accompanied by a concise description and a longer essay on the broader historical background of the period.
           
Schlüter is the artistic force behind what is now known as Baroque Berlin, and Schlüter in Berlin is the first book to offer English–language readers a look at his many contributions to the city.

80 pages | 20 color plates, 15 halftones, | 5 x 7 3/4 | © 2014

Art: European Art


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Table of Contents

Introduction

Hans-Ulrich Kessler

Works by Schlüter in Berlin-Mitte

1. Zeughaus (Arsenal)

Fritz-Eugen Keller

2. Berlin Cathedral

Bernd Wolfgang Lindemann

3. St Mary’s Church

Claire Guinomet

4. St Nicholas Church

Philipp Zitzlsperger

5. Berlin City Palace

Guido Hinterkeuser

Works by Schlüter in Berlin-Charlottenburg

6. The Equestrian Monument to the Great Elector

Hans-Ulrich Kessler

7. The Bronze Statue of Elector Frederick III

Thomas Fischbacher

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