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Distributed for University of British Columbia Press

The Red Man’s on the Warpath

The Image of the "Indian" and the Second World War

Distributed for University of British Columbia Press

The Red Man’s on the Warpath

The Image of the "Indian" and the Second World War

During the Second World War, thousands of First Nations people joined in the national crusade to defend freedom and democracy. High rates of Native enlistment and public demonstrations of patriotism encouraged Canadians to re-examine the roles and status of Native people in Canadian society. The Red Man’s on the Warpath explores how wartime symbolism and imagery propelled the “Indian problem” onto the national agenda, and why assimilation remained the goal of post-war Canadian Indian policy – even though the war required that it be rationalized in new ways.

240 pages


Table of Contents

Introduction

1 The Image of the “Indian” in English Canada, 1930-39

2 The “Administrative Indian” as Soldier and Conscript, 1939-45

3 The “Public Indian” Goes to War, September 1939-December 1941

4 Winning the War Only to Lose the Peace? Reconstructing the “Public Indian,” 1943-45

5 The “Administrative Indian” at the Threshold of Peace, January-March 1946

6 Into the Arena: Marshalling the Competing Indian Images in Postwar Canada, 1945-48

7 Whither the “Indian”? The Special Joint Senate and House of Commons Committee to Reconsider the Indian Act, 1946-48

Conclusion

Notes

Bibliography

Index

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