Rosamond Jacob

Third Person Singular

Leeann Lane

Rosamond Jacob

Leeann Lane

Distributed for University College Dublin Press

344 pages
Paper $35.00 ISBN: 9781906359546 Published November 2010 For sale in North America only
Born in Waterford in 1888 Rosamond Jacob, of Quaker background, was in many cases a crowd member rather than a leader in the campaigns in which she participated - the turn of the century language revival, the suffrage campaign, the campaigns of the revolutionary period. She adopted an anti-Treaty stance in the 1920s, moving towards a fringe involvement in the activities of socialist republicanism in the early 1930s while continuing to vote Fianna Fail. Her commitment to feminist concerns was life long but at no point did she take or was capable of a leadership role. However, it was Jacob’s failure to carve out a strong place in history as an activist which makes her interesting as a subject for biography. Her ’ordinariness’ offers an alternative lens on the biographical project. By failing to marry, by her inability to find meaningful paid work, by her countless refusals from publishers, by the limited sales of what work was published, Jacob offers a key into lives more ordinary within the urban middle classes of her time, and suggests a new perspective on female lives.Jacob’s life, galvanised at all times by political and feminist debate, offers a means of exploring how the central issues which shaped Irish politics and society in the first half of the twentieth century were experienced and digested by those outside the leadership cadre.
Contents
ONE - Introduction TWO - Suffrage and Nationalism, 1904-14 THREE - Revolutionary years - Waterford 1915-19 FOUR - Revolutionary years - a Dublin focus 1916-21 FIVE - Single women, sex and the new State SIX - Politics1922-36 SEVEN - Conclusion(s) - Decline and nostalgia 1937-60 Bibliography Index.
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