New Technologies and Renaissance Studies II

Edited by Tassie Gniady, Kris McAbee, Jessica Murphy

New Technologies and Renaissance Studies II

Edited by Tassie Gniady, Kris McAbee, Jessica Murphy

Distributed for Iter Press

310 pages | 6 x 9
Cloth $70.00 ISBN: 9780866985154 Published January 2015
Near the forefront of any examination of disciplinary pursuits in the academy today, among the many important issues being addressed is the role of computing and its integration into, and perhaps revolutionizing of, central methodological approaches. The series New Technologies in Medieval and Renaissance Studies addresses this context from both broad and narrow perspectives, with anticipated discussions rooted in areas including literature, art history, musicology, and culture in the medieval and Renaissance periods.

In the fourth volume of the New Technologies in Medieval and Renaissance Studies series, volume editors Tassie Gniady, Kris McAbee, and Jessica Murphy bring together some of the best work from the New Technologies in Medieval and Renaissance Studies panels at the Renaissance Society of America (RSA) annual meetings for the years 2004–2010. These essays demonstrate a dedication to grounding the use of “newest” practices in the theories of the early modern period. At the same time, the essays are interested in the moment—the needs of scholars then, the theories of media that informed current understanding, and the tools used to conduct studies.
Contents
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
Underpinnings of the Social Edition? A Brief Narrative, 2004–9, for the
Renaissance English Knowledgebase (REKn) and Professional Reading Environment (PReE) Projects, and a Framework for Next Steps
Ray Siemens et al. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
A Digital Research Community in Medieval and Renaissance Studies:
The ARC Network for Early European Research, 2005–2010
Toby Burrows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51
“A hawk from a handsaw”: Collating Possibilities with the Shakespeare Quartos Archive
Jim Kuhn . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67
Moving Early Modern Theatre Online: The Records of Early English
Drama Introduces the Early Modern London Theatres Website
Tanya Hagen, Sally-Beth MacLean and Michele Pasin . . . . . . . . 91
Sandrart.net: An Online Edition of a Seventeenth-Century Text
Anna Schreurs, Carsten Blüm and Thorsten Wübbena . . . . . . . 115
Virtual Restoration: The Art and Technology of “Recreating” Italian Renaissance Paintings
Diane Cole Ahl . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 149
Greensickness and HPV: A Comparative Analysis?
Jessica C. Murphy, William H. Hsu, et al. . . . . . . . . . . . 171
Resuscitability and “Excellent New” Early Modern Verse
Kris McAbee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 199
“Speak the Speech”: Dramatic Blank Verse As a New Medium on the
English Stage
Farrah Lehman . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 217
Broadside Love: A Comparison of Reading with Digital Tools versus
Deep Knowledge in the Ballads of Samuel Pepys
Tassie Gniady . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 243
Emblematica Online: A Case Study in Humanities Research Projects
Kathleen Marie Smith . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 261
A Modest Proposal for Scholarly Publishing: 21st-Century Ideas for a
19th-Century System
Shawn Martin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 285
Contributors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 305
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