New Technologies and Renaissance Studies

Edited by William R. Bowen, Raymond G. Siemens

New Technologies and Renaissance Studies

Edited by William R. Bowen, Raymond G. Siemens

Distributed for Iter Press

330 pages | 6 x 9
Cloth $65.00 ISBN: 9780866983693 Published June 2008
Near the forefront of any examination of disciplinary pursuits in the academy today, among the many important issues being addressed is the role of computing and its integration into, and perhaps revolutionizing of, central methodological approaches. The series New Technologies in Medieval and Renaissance Studies addresses this context from both broad and narrow perspectives, with anticipated discussions rooted in areas including literature, art history, musicology, and culture in the medieval and Renaissance periods.

The first volume of the series, New Technologies and Renaissance Studies, presents a collection of contributions to one ongoing forum for the dialogue which lies at the heart of the book series, the annual "conference within a conference" of the same name which takes place during the Renaissance Society of America gathering, dedicated specifically to the intersection of computational methods and Renaissance studies. Papers in this volume exemplify those fruitful and productive exchanges, from their inception at the 2001 meeting in Chicago to the 2005 meeting in Cambridge.
Contents
Preface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . vii
Being Reborn: The Humanities, Computing and Styles . . . . . 1
of Scientic Reasoning
Willard McCarty
A Pragmatics of Re-Conception? (A Response to Willard . . . . 23
McCarty, “Being Reborn: The Humanities, Computing
and Styles of Scientic Reasoning”)
Raymond G. Siemens
Digital Still Images and Renaissance Studies (with a Short . . . 27
Section on Digital Video)
Michael Greenhalgh
Renaissance Studies and New Technologies: A Collection . . . 73
of “Electronic Texts”
David L. Gants and R. Carter Hailey
Electronic Sound . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93
Susan Forscher Weiss and Ichiro Fujinaga
Iter: Building an Eective Knowledge Base . . . . . . . . . 101
William R. Bowen
ACLS Humanities E-Book Project . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110
Eileen Gardiner and Ronald G. Musto
EMLS: A Case Study in the Development of an . . . . . . . . 144
Academic Ejournal
Lisa Hopkins, Raymond G. Siemens, and Matthew Steggle
Creating a Website for Writing on Hands: Memory and . . . . . 161
Knowledge in Early Modern Europe
Peter M. Lukehart
Reading and Teaching Shakespeare in the Virtual Library . . . 177
Rebecca Bushnell
Performers on the Road: Tracking Their Tours with the . . . . 191
REED Patrons and Performances Website
Sally-Beth MacLean and Alan Somerset
The Perdita Project: Women’s Writing, Manuscript . . . . . . 230
Studies and XML Tagging
Jonathan Gibson
Encoding Renaissance Electronic Texts . . . . . . . . . . 243
Ian Lancashire
The Devil is in the Details: An Electronic Edition of the . . . . 261
Devonshire MS (British Library Additional MS 17,492), its
Encoding and Prototyping
Raymond G. Siemens, Karin Armstrong, and Barbara Bond
Coincidental Technologies: Moving Parts in Early Modern . . . 300
Books and in Early Hypertext
Richard Cunningham
The Exploration and Development of Tools for Active . . . . . 321
Reading and Electronic Texts
Stephanie F. Thomas
For more information, or to order this book, please visit https://press.uchicago.edu
Google preview here