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Distributed for University of British Columbia Press

Militia Myths

Ideas of the Canadian Citizen Soldier, 1896-1921

Distributed for University of British Columbia Press

Militia Myths

Ideas of the Canadian Citizen Soldier, 1896-1921

This cultural history of the amateur military tradition traces the origins of the citizen soldier ideal from long before Canadians donned khaki and boarded troopships for the Western Front. Before the Great War, Canada’s military culture was in transition as the country navigated an uncertain relationship with the United States and fought an imperial war in South Africa. Militia Myths explores the ideological transformation that took place between 1896 and 1921, arguing that by the end of the War, the untrained citizen volunteer had replaced the long-serving militiaman as the archetypal Canadian soldier.

Table of Contents

Introduction: Canadian Ideas of the Citizen Soldier

1 A Military Spirit in Canada, 1896-98

2 An Army for Empire, 1898-1901

3 “Don’t Call Me Tommy,” 1901-04

4 “Who Are You Going to Fight?” 1905-08

5 Continental Commitments, 1909-11

6 Involuntary Action, 1911-14

7 War and Citizenship, 1914-17

8 Victory and Vindication, 1918-21

Conclusion: A Citizen’s Duty in “Canada’s Century”

Appendices

Notes

Bibliography

Index

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