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Distributed for University of British Columbia Press

Landing Native Fisheries

Indian Reserves and Fishing Rights in British Columbia, 1849-1925

Distributed for University of British Columbia Press

Landing Native Fisheries

Indian Reserves and Fishing Rights in British Columbia, 1849-1925

Landing Native Fisheries reveals the contradictions and consequences of an Indian land policy premised on access to fish, on one hand, and a program of fisheries management intended to open the resource to newcomers, on the other. Beginning with the first treaties signed on Vancouver Island between 1850 and 1854, Douglas Harris maps the connections between the colonial land policy and the law governing the fisheries. In so doing, Harris rewrites the history of colonial dispossession in British Columbia, offering a new and nuanced examination of the role of law in the consolidation of power within the colonial state.

268 pages

Law and Society


Table of Contents

Introduction

1 Treaties, Reserves, and Fisheries Law

2 Land Follows Fish

3 Exclusive Fisheries

4 Exclusive Fisheries and the Public Right to Fish

5 Indian Reserves and Fisheries

6 Constructing an Indian Food Fishery

7 Licensing the Commercial Salmon Fishery

8 Land and Fisheries Detached

Conclusion

Appendix

Notes

Bibliography

Index

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