The Lady Next Door

Harold Begbie

The Lady Next Door

Harold Begbie

Distributed for University College Dublin Press

Harold Begbie (1871-1929) was born in Suffolk, England. Begbie was an Evangelical Protestant with tendencies towards theological modernism, who believed in social reform based on religious revivalism and individual regeneration. He was a well-known journalist in his time and published over a hundred books, but is now chiefly remembered for defending the existence of the Angel of Mons.
Paper $25.00 ISBN: 9781904558521 Published March 2006 For sale in North America only
"The Lady Next Door", in other words, Ireland, is an account of the tour of Ireland by a pro-Home Rule British Liberal journalist, published in 1914. It provides valuable interview material and personal impressions of several prominent Nationalists and Southern Unionists, giving a snapshot of the views of key activists on what they thought was the eve of Home Rule and their expectations of what a Home Rule Ireland would be like. He gives valuable insight into the ideological tensions of the Liberal-Nationalist alliance, particularly with reference to Nonconformist unease about the prospects for Ulster under Home Rule, the development of moralist rhetoric in defense of Liberal policy, and the tendency of some British commentators to idealize Ireland as a pious rural Arcadia.
Contents
Introduction by Patrick Maume THE LADY NEXT DOOR - Foreword Preface By Way of Introduction The Bishop’s Dream The Life of a Town Testimonies A Quaker’s Parlour Fenian, Lawyer and Earl Monumentum Aere Perennius Petty Larcenies A Case of Persecution The Fine Flower Because it is Always Dublin The Dame A Corner of Ulster Hannah At the Gate of Democracy Manufactured Mortality. The Orange Capital Babies Maids of the Mill Wealth The Gospel of Mammon Conclusions Note - On the Sweating of Belfast.
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