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Distributed for University of British Columbia Press

Fractured Homeland

Federal Recognition and Algonquin Identity in Ontario

Distributed for University of British Columbia Press

Fractured Homeland

Federal Recognition and Algonquin Identity in Ontario

In 1992, the Algonquins of Pikwakanagan, the only federally recognized Algonquin reserve in Ontario, launched a comprehensive land claim. The action not only drew attention to the fact that Canada had acquired Algonquin land without negotiating a treaty, but it also focused attention on the two-thirds of Algonquins who have never been recognized as Indian. Fractured Homeland is Bonita Lawrence’s stirring account of how the claim forced federally unrecognized Algonquin in Ontario to confront both the issue of their own identity and the failure of Algonquin leaders – who launched the claim – to develop a more inclusive vision of nationhood.


344 pages


Table of Contents

Preface

Introduction

Abbreviations and Definitions Relating to the Land Claim

Part 1: Algonquin Survival and Resurgence in the Ottawa River Watershed

1 Algonquin Diplomacy, Resistance, and Dispossession

2 The Fracturing of the Algonquin Homeland

3 Aboriginal Title and the Comprehensive Claims Process

4 The Algonquin Land Claim

5 Reclaiming Algonquin Identity

Part 2: Algonquin Communities in the Mississippi, Rideau, and Lower Madawaska River Watersheds

6 The Development of Ardoch Algonquin First Nation

7 The Effect of the Land Claim in the Region

8 Uranium Resistance: Defending the Land

Part 3: Algonquin Communities in the Watershed of the Bonnechere and Petawawa Rivers

9 The Bonnechere Algonquin Communities and Greater Golden Lake

10 Perspectives from Pikwakanagan

Part 4: Algonquin Communities in the Upper Madawaska and York River Watersheds

11 The Upper Madawaska River Communities: Whitney, Madewaska, and Sabine

12 The People of Kijicho Manitou: Baptiste Lake and Bancroft

Part 5: From Mattawa to Ottawa – Algonquin Communities Along the Kichi Sibi

13 Algonquin Communities along the Ottawa River

Part 6: Conclusion

14 Algonquin Identity and Nationhood

Notes

Bibliography

Index

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