Dissecting Irish Politics

Essays in Honour of Brian Farrell

Edited by Richard Sinnot and Tom Garvin

Dissecting Irish Politics

Edited by Richard Sinnot and Tom Garvin

Distributed for University College Dublin Press

Cloth $45.00 ISBN: 9781904558125 Published May 2004 For sale in North America only
Essays by leading academic, political and media figures in honour of Brian Farrell, the well-known political interviewer and former member of the Department of Politics, in celebration of his 75th birthday in 2004. The essays cover aspects of history of Irish democracy, the role of government institutions and their relations with Europe, government finance, the party system, political campaigning for elections and referendums, the lobby system and government relations with the media.
Contents
1 Brian Farrell - political scientist, teacher, broadcaster and colleague by Maurice Manning 2 Cogadh na nCarad - the creation of the Irish political elite by Tom Garvin 3 The Governor-General and the Boundary Commission crisis of 1924-5 by Ronan Keane 4 De Valera and democracy by Peter Mair 5 The suicidal army - civil-military relations and strategy in independent Ireland by Theo Farrell 6 The role of Taoiseach - chairman or chief? by Garret FitzGerald 7 Paying for government by Niamh Hardiman 8 The office of ombudsman in Ireland by Michael Mills 9 Irish government and European governance by Brigid Laffan 10 Critical elections and the prehistory of the Irish party system by John Coakley 11 Funding for referendum campaigns - equal or equitable? by Richard Sinnott 12 Before campaigns were ’modern’ - Irish electioneering in times past by David Farrell 13 The parliamentary lobby system by Stephen Collins 14 The best newsmen we can expect? by Jean Blondel 15 Government and broadcasting - maintaining a balance by Peter Feeney List of Brian Farrell’s publications Index.
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