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Distributed for University of British Columbia Press

Conflicting Visions

Canada and India in the Cold War World, 1946-76

Distributed for University of British Columbia Press

Conflicting Visions

Canada and India in the Cold War World, 1946-76

In 1974, India shocked the world by detonating a nuclear device. In the diplomatic controversy that ensued, the Canadian government expressed outrage that India had extracted plutonium from a Canadian reactor donated only for peaceful purposes. In the aftermath, relations between the two nations cooled considerably. As Conflicting Visions reveals, Canada and India’s relationship was turbulent long before the first bomb blast. Canada’s expectations of how the former British colony would behave following its independence in 1947 led to a series of misperceptions and miscommunications that strained bilateral relations for decades.

320 pages


Table of Contents

Introduction

1 Plain Tales from the DEA: Why India?

2 Building a Bridge: Bilateral Relations, 1947–49

3 A Helping Hand: The Genesis of Canada’s Aid Relationship with India, 1950–51

4 In Close and Friendly Collaboration: Canada and India during the Korean War, 1950–53

5 A Special Relationship? 1952–57

6 Friendly but Not Close: The Diefenbaker Years, 1957–63

7 Mounting Problems, 1963–66

8 An Inability to Influence: Nuclear Cooperation and the NPT Negotiations, 1966–68

9 Old Hopes and a New Realism? Bilateral Relations, 1968–73

10 Choices Made: The Descent of Bilateral Relations, 1974–76

Conclusion

Notes

Bibliography

Index

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