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Crime and Justice, Volume 48

American Sentencing

American Sentencing provides an up-to-date and comprehensive overview of efforts in the state and the federal systems to make sentencing fairer, reduce overuse of imprisonment, and help offenders live law-abiding lives. It addresses a variety of topics and themes related to sentencing and reform, including racial disparities, violence prediction, plea negotiation, case processing, federal and state guidelines, California’s historic “realignment,” and more.
 
This volume covers what students, scholars, practitioners, and policy makers need to know about how sentencing really works, what a half century’s “reforms” have and have not accomplished, how sentencing processes can be made fairer, and how sentencing outcomes can be made more just. Its writers are among America’s leading scholarly specialists—often the leading specialist—in their fields.
 
Clearly and accessibly written, American Sentencing is ideal for teaching use in seminars and courses on sentencing, courts, and criminal justice. Its authors’ diverse perspectives shed light on these issues, making it likely the single, most authoritative source of information on the state of sentencing in America today.
 

Table of Contents

Preface
Michael Tonry
 
Fifty Years of American Sentencing Reform: Nine Lessons
Michael Tonry
 
The Wild West of Sentencing Reform: Lessons from California
Robert Weisberg
 
Forty Years of American Sentencing Guidelines: What Have We Learned?
Richard S. Frase
 
Federal Sentencing after Booker
Paul J. Hofer
 
The Evolution of Sentencing Guidelines in Minnesota and England and Wales
Julian V. Roberts
 
Model Penal Code: Sentencing—Workable Limits on Mass Punishment
Kevin R. Reitz and Cecelia M. Klingele
 
Trials and Tribulations: The Trial Tax and the Process of Punishment
Brian D. Johnson
 
Have Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Sentencing Declined?
Ryan D. King and Michael T. Light
 
Predictions of Dangerousness in Sentencing: Déjà Vu All Over Again
Michael Tonry
 
Criminal Courts as Inhabited Institutions: Making Sense of Difference and Similarity in Sentencing
Jeffery T. Ulmer
 
Index

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