Paper $37.95 ISBN: 9780774816571 Published January 2011 For sale in USA only
Cloth $105.00 ISBN: 9780774816564 Published July 2010 For sale in USA only

Administering the Colonizer

Manchuria’s Russians under Chinese Rule, 1918-29

Blaine R. Chiasson,

Administering the Colonizer

Blaine R. Chiasson,

Distributed for University of British Columbia Press

304 pages
Paper $37.95 ISBN: 9780774816571 Published January 2011 For sale in USA only
Cloth $105.00 ISBN: 9780774816564 Published July 2010 For sale in USA only
Harbin of the 1920s was viewed by Westerners as a world turned upside down. The Chinese government had taken over administration of the Russian-founded Chinese Eastern Railway concession, and its large Russian population. This account of the decade-long multi-ethnic and multinational administrative experiment in North Manchuria reveals that China not only created policies to promote Chinese sovereignty but also instituted measures to protect the Russian minority. This multi-faceted book is a historical examination of how an ethnic, cultural, and racial majority coexisted with a minority of a different culture and race. It restores to history the multiple national influences that have shaped northern China and Chinese nationalism.
Contents

1 Introduction: Where Yellow Ruled White – Harbin, 1929

2 Railway Frontier: North Manchuria before 1917

3 The Chinese Eastern Railway: From Russian Concession to Chinese Special District

4 Securing the Special District: Police, Courts, and Prisons

5 Experiments Co-Administering the Chinese Eastern Railway

6 Manchurian Landlords: The Struggle over the Special District’s Land

7 Whose City Is This? Special District Municipal Governance

8 Making Russians Chinese: Secondary and Post-Secondary Education

9 Conclusion: Playing Guest and Host on the Manchurian Stage

Appendix

Notes

Bibliography

Index

For more information, or to order this book, please visit https://press.uchicago.edu
Google preview here

Chicago Manual of Style

RSS Feed

RSS feed of the latest books from University of British Columbia Press. RSS Feed