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Echolocation in Bats and Dolphins

Although bats and dolphins live in very different environments, are vastly different in size, and hunt different kinds of prey, both groups have evolved similar sonar systems, known as echolocation, to locate food and navigate the skies and seas. While much research has been conducted over the past thirty years on echolocation in bats and dolphins, this volume is the first to compare what is known about echolocation in each group, to point out what information is missing, and to identify future areas of research.

Echolocation in Bats and Dolphins consists of six sections: mechanisms of echolocation signal production; the anatomy and physiology of signal reception and interpretation; performance and cognition; ecological and evolutionary aspects of echolocation mammals; theoretical and methodological topics; and possible echolocation capabilities in other mammals, including shrews, seals, and baleen whales. Animal behaviorists, ecologists, physiologists, and both scientists and engineers who work in the field of bioacoustics will benefit from this book.


631 pages | 10 halftones, 285 line drawings, 15 tables | 8-1/2 x 11 | © 2003

Biological Sciences: Anatomy, Behavioral Biology, Ecology, Evolutionary Biology, Physiology, Biomechanics, and Morphology

Reviews

“An extremely useful and timely work. Echolocation in Bats and Dolphins is a thorough volume that will make a significant contribution to both bat and dolphin research. Historically, the two fields of research have followed different paths and development, and this volume highlights those differences, which will no doubt benefit researchers in both fields. In addition, it is a wonderful forum for updating scientists in both fields as to the state of the art in the other. The editors are to be commended for their thorough and logical treatment of the deceptively broad topic of echolocation in these two diverse taxa.”

Dr. Douglas Nowacek | Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

“The book’s enormous scope covers how noises are made and analysed, how young animals learn to process such information and much more. Its style is technical but there is enough introductory material to bring you up to speed on biophysics. Those already familiar with either dolphins or bats will find this book provides both a fine update on recent research and a fabulous peek into a parallel world. For the more general biologist it provides fascinating insights into the similarities and divergences in the evolution of these mammalian masters of air and sea.”

Rebecca Shapley | New Scientist

“The list of authors contains many of the leading researchers, as well as young scientists who will be the leading researchers of tomorrow. This volume would serve as a good introduction to current research on biological sonar for nonspecialists or students, as well as a “must have” collection of papers for biological sonar researchers.”

Mark W. Sprague | Quarterly Review of Biology

“The book provides both a thorough scientific assessment of echolocation and an entrancing introduction to a developing fascinating field of research. Animal behaviorists, ecologists, physiologists, and both scientists and engineers who work in the field of bioacoustics will obviously greatly benefit from this book, but it should also be recommended to all researchers in natural sciences and especially oceanology who have an open interest in all the aspects of their interdisciplinary field of research. The book should definitely find its place on the shelves of the best documented libraries.”

Journal of Marine Systems

“The volume as a whole would be essential reading for any active researcher in echolocation.”

Andrea M. Simmons | Ethology

“The book serves as a valuable volume for the bioacoustic scientists in the early 21st century. It contains many papers which have already made an important impact by inspiring future studies of bioacoustics. It is nice to see all these interesting pieces of new work in a single book, together with a good share of high-quality reviews.”

Magnus Wahlberg | Aquatic Mammals

Table of Contents

Preface

Introduction | A Comparison of the Sonar Capabilities of Bats and Dolphins

Part One | ECHOLOCATION SIGNAL PRODUCTION, FEEDBACK, AND CONTROL SYSTEM

Part Two | AUDITORY SYSTEMS IN ECHOLOCATING MAMMALS

Part Three | PERFORMANCE AND COGNITION IN ECHOLOCATING MAMMALS

Part Four | ECOLOGICAL AND EVOLUTIONARY ASPECTS OF ECHOLOCATING MAMMALS

Part Five | ECHOLOCATION THEORY, ANALYSIS TECHNIQUES, AND APPLICTIONS

Part Six | POSSIBLE ECHOLOCATION ABILITIES IN OTHER MAMMALS

Author Index

Sunject Index

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