Cloth $90.00 ISBN: 9780226038865 Published July 2013
Paper $30.00 ISBN: 9780226044194 Published July 2013
E-book $7.00 to $30.00 About E-books ISBN: 9780226044224 Published July 2013

Meet Joe Copper

Masculinity and Race on Montana's World War II Home Front

Matthew L. Basso

Matthew L. Basso

360 pages | 29 halftones, 1 line drawing | 6 x 9 | © 2013
Cloth $90.00 ISBN: 9780226038865 Published July 2013
Paper $30.00 ISBN: 9780226044194 Published July 2013
E-book $7.00 to $30.00 About E-books ISBN: 9780226044224 Published July 2013
“I realize that I am a soldier of production whose duties are as important in this war as those of the man behind the gun.” So began the pledge that many home front men took at the outset of World War II when they went to work in the factories, fields, and mines while their compatriots fought in the battlefields of Europe and on the bloody beaches of the Pacific. The male experience of working and living in wartime America is rarely examined, but the story of men like these provides a crucial counter-narrative to the national story of Rosie the Riveter and GI Joe that dominates scholarly and popular discussions of World War II.


In Meet Joe Copper, Matthew L. Basso describes the formation of a powerful, white, working-class masculine ideology in the decades prior to the war, and shows how it thrived—on the job, in the community, and through union politics. Basso recalls for us the practices and beliefs of the first- and second-generation immigrant copper workers of Montana while advancing the historical conversation on gender, class, and the formation of a white ethnic racial identity. Meet Joe Copper provides a context for our ideas of postwar masculinity and whiteness and finally returns the men of the home front to our reckoning of the Greatest Generation and the New Deal era.

Pacific Coast Branch of the AHA: AHA-Pacific Coast Branch Book Award
Won

NY State Sch of Indust and Labor Relatio: Philip Taft Labor History Award
Won

View Recent Awards page for more award winning books.
CHOICE
"This well-written book centers on the historical experiences of workers, women, and people of color in a regional home-front context during WW II. As such, it meets the need for more scholarship on the home front during the war. Recent trends in US social history regarding the relationship between identity formation and relations of power greatly influence the book. Basso describes the formation of a powerful, white, working-class masculine ideology in the decades prior to WWII, and shows how it thrived on the job, in the community, and through union politics. Basso recalls the practices and beliefs of the first- and second-generation immigrant copper workers of Montana while advancing the historical conversation on gender, class, and the formation of a white ethnic racial identity."
Eileen Boris | author of Home to Work: Motherhood and the Politics of Industrial Homework in the United States
“Rosie the Riveter, move over! Here comes Joe Copper in a theoretically sophisticated, widely researched, and ever-engaging history that uncovers the making of gender and race. In this powerful labor and community history of the mines and smelters, Italian, Croatian, and Irish men struggled with management over the hiring of nonmales and nonwhites as much as over their workload and pay. After Matthew L. Basso, ‘the greatest generation’ must include home front men—their representations as well as actions, their subjectivities along with their prejudices. World War II will never look the same again.”
Karen Anderson | author of Wartime Women: Sex Roles, Family Relations, and the Status of Women During World War II
“Matthew L. Basso’s evidence and interpretations regarding the significance of masculinity to the values, actions, and concerns of working class civilian men in Montana’s copper industry substantially revise our understandings of the middle decades of the twentieth century.”
Contents
List of Illustrations
Acknowledgments

INTRODUCTION / GI Joe and Rosie the Riveter, Meet Joe Copper!

PART I: WHITE LABOR, 1882–1940
ONE / Butte: “Only White Men and Dagoes”
TWO / Black Eagle: Immigrants’ Bond
THREE / Anaconda: “Husky Smeltermen” and “Company Boys”

PART II: COPPER MEN AND THE CHALLENGES OF THE EARLY WAR HOME FRONT
FOUR / Redrafting Masculinity: Breadwinners, Shirkers, or “Soldiers of Production”
FIVE / The Emerging Labor Shortage: Independent Masculinity, Patriotic Demands, and the Threat of New Workers

PART III: MAKING THE HOME FRONT SOCIAL ORDER
SIX / Butte, 1942: White Men, Black Soldier-Miners, and the Limits of Popular Front Interracialism
SEVEN / Black Eagle, 1943: Home Front Servicemen, Women Workers, and the Maintenance of Immigrant Masculinity
EIGHT / Anaconda, 1944: White Women, Men of Color, and Cross-Class White Male Solidarity

CONCLUSION / The Man in the Blue-Collar Shirt: The Working Class and Postwar Masculinity

List of Abbreviations
Notes
Index
For more information, or to order this book, please visit http://www.press.uchicago.edu
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