Cloth $38.00 ISBN: 9780226470481 Published November 2011
Paper $15.00 ISBN: 9780226470498 Published November 2011
E-book $7.00 to $15.00 About E-books ISBN: 9780226470382 Published September 2011

The Iliad of Homer

Homer

The Iliad of Homer
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Read Richmond Lattimore's original introduction to his translation. (PDF format, 9.7Mb).

Homer

Translated by Richmond Lattimore
With a new Introduction and Notes by Richard Martin
608 pages | 2 line drawings | 5-1/2 x 8-1/2 | © 2011
Cloth $38.00 ISBN: 9780226470481 Published November 2011
Paper $15.00 ISBN: 9780226470498 Published November 2011
E-book $7.00 to $15.00 About E-books ISBN: 9780226470382 Published September 2011

"Sing, goddess, the anger of Peleus’ son Achilleus / and its devastation." For sixty years, that's how Homer has begun the Iliad in English, in Richmond Lattimore's faithful translation—the gold standard for generations of students and general readers.

This long-awaited new edition of Lattimore's Iliad is designed to bring the book into the twenty-first century—while leaving the poem as firmly rooted in ancient Greece as ever. Lattimore's elegant, fluent verses—with their memorably phrased heroic epithets and remarkable fidelity to the Greek—remain unchanged, but classicist Richard Martin has added a wealth of supplementary materials designed to aid new generations of readers. A new introduction sets the poem in the wider context of Greek life, warfare, society, and poetry, while line-by-line notes at the back of the volume offer explanations of unfamiliar terms, information about the Greek gods and heroes, and literary appreciation. A glossary and maps round out the book.

The result is a volume that actively invites readers into Homer's poem, helping them to understand fully the worlds in which he and his heroes lived—and thus enabling them to marvel, as so many have for centuries, at Hektor and Ajax, Paris and Helen, and the devastating rage of Achilleus.

Economist

"Both lucid and learned, Lattimore writes with a certain grace, capturing the combination of nobility and speed which over 100 years ago Matthew Arnold famously heard in Homer’s work. . . . Read Richmond Lattimore's translation for the epic scale and narrative of Homer's poem."

Chronicle of Higher Education
"Martin's introduction surpasses all rivals. . . . Lattimore's Iliad is best for those who want to feel the epic from the loins up, its rush, its reprieves, and its overwhelming rage."
Contents

Introduction
Translator’s note
Maps

Book One
Book Two
Book Three
Book Four
Book Five
Book Six
Book Seven
Book Eight
Book Nine
Book Ten
Book Eleven
Book Twelve
Book Thirteen
Book Fourteen
Book Fifteen
Book Sixteen
Book Seventeen
Book Eighteen
Book Nineteen
Book Twenty
Book Twenty-One
Book Twenty-Two
Book Twenty-Three
Book Twenty-Four

Notes
Bibliography
Glossary of Names

For more information, or to order this book, please visit http://www.press.uchicago.edu
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