Skip to main content

Distributed for University of British Columbia Press

Tammarniit (Mistakes)

Inuit Relocation in the Eastern Arctic, 1939-63

Distributed for University of British Columbia Press

Tammarniit (Mistakes)

Inuit Relocation in the Eastern Arctic, 1939-63

Through an examination of the roles of relief and relocation in response to welfare and other perceived problems and the federal government’s overall goal of assimilating the Inuit into the dominant Canadian culture, this book questions the seeming benevolence of the post-Second World War Canadian welfare state. The authors have made extensive use of archival documents, many of which have not been available to researchers before. The early chapters cover the first wave of government expansion in the north, the policy debate that resulted in the decision to relocate Inuit, and the actual movement of people and materials. The second half of the book focuses on conditions following relocation and addresses the second wave of state expansion in the late fifties and the emergence of a new dynamic of intervention.

434 pages


Table of Contents

Preface

Introduction

1 Are Inuit Indians?: Relief, Jurisdiction, and Government Responsibility

2 Social Welfare and Social Crisis in the Eastern Arctic

3 Planning for Relocation in the Eastern Arctic

4 Recolonizing the Arctic Islands: The 1953 Relocations to Resolute Bay and Craig Harbour

5 The Ennadai Lake Relocations, 1950-60

6 The Garry Lake Famine

7 The Whale Cove Relocation

8 Relocation and Responsibility, 1955-63

Notes

Bibliography

Index

Be the first to know

Get the latest updates on new releases, special offers, and media highlights when you subscribe to our email lists!

Sign up here for updates about the Press