Skip to main content
Shopping cart: items Cart

Distributed for University of British Columbia Press

The Rowell-Sirois Commission and the Remaking of Canadian Federalism

As the Depression ground on in the late 1930s, Canadian provinces faced increasing fiscal obligations but limited funds, while the dominion had fewer responsibilities but lucrative revenue sources. In 1937, a public inquiry was struck. After much federal-provincial wrangling, a plan for a bold new form of federalism based on the national collection of taxes and unconditional transfers of these revenues to provinces based on fiscal need was struck. This astute examination shows that the commission’s report provided a storehouse of innovative ideas and shaped policy—and thinking—about federalism for decades.
 

350 pages | 4 halftones, 3 line drawings | 6 x 9

The C.D. Howe Series in Canadian Political History

Political Science: American Government and Politics


Reviews

The Rowell-Sirois Commission and the Remaking of Canadian Federalism is a thoughtful and well-written analysis of one of the most important royal commissions in Canadian history. Collecting a very impressive body of primary research, Wardhaugh and Ferguson provide evidence from the key players in politics, academia, the bureaucracy, and especially the commissioners and support staff.”

Stephen Henderson, Acadia University

The Rowell-Sirois Commission and the Remaking of Canadian Federalism is an invaluable study of Canadian federalism, past and present: history, political science, public policy, and economics. There’s an enormous amount of new material here that illuminates the precipitation and fallout of the Rowell-Sirois Commission.”

Lisbeth Heaman, McGill University

Be the first to know

Get the latest updates on new releases, special offers, and media highlights when you subscribe to our email lists!

Sign up here for updates about the Press