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Distributed for University of British Columbia Press

Moved by the State

Forced Relocation and Making a Good Life in Postwar Canada

Distributed for University of British Columbia Press

Moved by the State

Forced Relocation and Making a Good Life in Postwar Canada

From the 1950s to the 1970s, the Canadian government relocated people living in rural and urban communities, often against their will, in order to alleviate the all-too-common lack of social services and economic opportunities. Moved by the State offers a completely new interpretation of this undertaking, focusing on the bureaucrats and academics who designed and implemented these relocations – and on the larger development project they were pursuing. Tina Loo’s finely crafted history reveals the optimistic belief underpinning postwar relocations: the power of the interventionist state to do good.

Table of Contents

Introduction

1 “No More Canadians Will Starve!”: Development, Discipline, and Decolonizing the North

2 “The Governmentality Game”: Problematizing, Resettling, and Democratizing Newfoundland

3 “Artisans of Their Destiny”: Participation, Power, and Place in Quebec’s Backcountry

4 “Deviating from the Strict Letter of the Law”: Race, Poverty, and Planning in Postwar Halifax

5 “A Fourth Level of Government”? Urban Renewal, State Power, and Democracy in Vancouver’s East Side

Conclusion

Notes; Bibliography; Index

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