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The Management of the Matobo Hills in Zimbabwe

Perceptions of the Indigenous Communities on Their Involvement and Use of Traditional Conservation Practices

Since 1992, when the World Heritage Committee established its category of “cultural landscapes,” scholarly debates have ensued as to how they could best be managed. One approach, which appears to have gained significance over the past two decades, considers using traditional conservation practices in addition to engaging local indigenous communities in the stewardship of these exemplary sites. Based on the perspectives of the indigenous people of the Matobo Hills, this investigation studies the extent to which both traditional conservation practices and local involvement can be germane to the administration of World Heritage Cultural Landscapes.
 

148 pages | 25 color plates, 10 halftones, | 8 x 10 3/4

Archaeological Studies Leiden University

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Reviews

"The Management of the Matobo Hills in Zimbabwe is beautifully presented, well written, sectioned off into sub-titled chunks and
filled with images, which make it very pick-up-and-flick-through-able."

Azania: Archaeological Research in Africa

Table of Contents

Contents
Abstract
Acknowledgements
 
1 Introduction
                The Conservation of Cultural Landscapes in Colonial Africa
                The Conservation of Cultural Landscapes in Independent Africa
                Aim and Objectives of the Study
                Approaches to the Study
                Scope and Organisation of the study
2 Indigenous communities, Archaeology and World Heritage Landscapes
                Introduction
                Brief History and Explanation of Indigenous Communities
                The Concept of Indigenous Communities in Africa
                Indigenous Archaeology and the Complicity of Indigenous Communities
                Nature of Indigenous Communities In World Hertiage Landscapes
                Summary
3 The Matobo Hills: Nature of the World Heritage Cultural Landscape
                Introduction
                The Matobo Hills
                Geology
                Climate: Past and Present
                Drainage and Hydrology
                Flora and Fauna
                Present Land Use
                Summary
4 Profile of the Matobo Hills Local Indigenous communities and the History of Settlement
                Introduction
                The Late Stone Age Hunter-Gatherer Indigenous Communities in the Matobo Hills
                The Indigenous Farming Communities of the Matobo Hills
                State Formation in Western Zimbabwe and Local Indigenous Communities in the Matobo Hills
                Contemporary African Local Indigenous Communities in the Matobo Hills
                European Local Indigenous Communities in the Matobo Hills
5 European Approaches to the Management of the Matobo Hills
                Introduction
                European Views of the Matobo Hills
                The Management of the Matobo Hills
                Founding of the National Park in the Matobo Hills
                Saving the Matobo Hills through Scientific Conservation
                Eviction of the Local Indigenous Communities from the National Park
                The Legislation and the Management of Cultural Heritage Sites in the Matobo Hills
                Post Colonial Management of Cultural Heritage Sites in the Matobo Hills
                Proclamation of the Matobo Hills as a World Heritage Cultural Landscape
                Summary
6 The Traditional Conservation Practices of the Matobo Hills
                Introduction
                Understanding Traditional Conservation Practices
                The Traditional Conservation Practices of the Matobo Hills
                Summary
7 Perspectives of Local Indigenous Communities
                Introduction
                Employment, Tourism and the Renaissance of Traditional Conservation Practices
                Revenue Generation, Development of the Matobo District and the Support of Tourism
                Sharing of Financial Benefits
                Reclaiming of Ancestral Lands
                Politics and the Breakdown of Traditional Leaders’ Authority
                Christianity and the Breakdown of Traditional Conservation Practices
                Power Struggles in the Matobo Hills
                Summary
8 Discussion and Conclusion
                Introduction
                Challenges and Constraints
                Conclusion: Important Considerations
References
Curriculum Vitae
 

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