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Distributed for University of British Columbia Press

In the Spirit of ’68

Youth Culture, the New Left, and the Reimagining of Acadia

Distributed for University of British Columbia Press

In the Spirit of ’68

Youth Culture, the New Left, and the Reimagining of Acadia

The 1960s were a victorious decade for francophones in New Brunswick, who witnessed the election of the first Acadian premier and the opening of a French-language university. But in 1968, students took to the streets, demanding further concessions. Belliveau debunks the idea that students were simply heirs to a long line of nationalists seeking more rights for francophones. The student movement emerged in the late 1950s as an expression of the province’s changing youth culture and then evolved as students drew inspiration from the New Left. They shifted allegiance from liberalism to radical communitarianism and ultimately fuelled a new brand of Acadian nationalism in the 1970s.


260 pages


Table of Contents

Introduction: The Acadian Student Movements of the 1960s – A Leftist or Nationalist Force?

1 The Golden Age, or the Acadian National Project at the Crossroads

2 The Birth of an Autonomous Student Sphere in Moncton, 1957–66

3 The Early Liberal-Reformist Student Movement, 1964–67

4 The Birth of the Second Moncton Student Movement, 1968

5 Propagation of Neo-nationalist Ideas, 1968–74

Conclusion

Notes; Works Cited; Index

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