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Distributed for University of British Columbia Press

Environmental Health Risks and Public Policy

Decision Making in Free Societies

As society's awareness of environmental effects on public health has grown, scientists (especially epidemiologists) have been increasingly drawn into the public arena. The design of studies, the manipulation of statistics, and additional risk factors influence the acceptance of "hazards" as clearly causing certain diseases. In addition, the often major economic effects of reducing these health hazards make formulation of public policy concerning their control a fractious business. Environmental scientists, the media, lawyers, and politicians have difficulty dealing with multifactoral disease, and are still learning how the questions should be framed for an informed public debate on the issues raised. Environmental Health Risks and Public Policy compares decision making in Canada, Britain, and the United States, and the impact of different political traditions on the process. The place and limitations of formal risk assessment are discussed.

129 pages


Table of Contents

Acknowledgments

Introduction

Setting the Stage: Critical Risks

Mandated Science: Major Issues in Health and Public Policy

A Survival Kit for the Environmental Jungle

Conclusion

References

Index

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