Why People Need Plants

Edited by Carlton Wood and Nicolette Habgood

Edited by Carlton Wood and Nicolette Habgood

Distributed for Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew

191 pages | 200 color plates | 7 1/2 x 10 | © 2010
Paper $30.00 ISBN: 9781842464250 Published September 2010 For sale in Canada, Mexico, and the USA

We live surrounded by the beauty—and the bounty—of the botanical world, but rarely do we stop to think seriously about all the roles plants play, many of them crucial to life on earth. After reading Why People Need Plants, however, we won’t be likely to take the earth’s flora for granted ever again.


Accessible and wide-ranging, Why People Need Plants covers such topics as food production, biofuels, medicine, biodiversity, conservation, economics, genetic modification, and many more—all aimed at demonstrating the importance of plants to nearly every aspect of human life and society. A collaboration between the Open University and the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, with assistance from the Royal Horticultural Society, the book will inform—and surprise—plant lovers, gardeners, and students of all levels of knowledge.

Contents
Chapter 1    Introduction

I    Uses of plants   
Chapter 2    Food crops
Chapter 3    Wood, fibre and starch crops
Chapter 4    Biofuels
Chapter 5    Plants in crime
II   Plants and health
Chapter 6    Plants for nutrition and well-being
Chapter 7    Medicinal plants
Chapter 8    Drink and drugs
III  Modern techniques in plant biology
Chapter 9    Micropropagation
Chapter 10  Genetically modified plants
Chapter 11  Natural plant protection
IV  Plants and the planet
Chapter 12  The impact of humankind on the planet
Chapter 13  Conservation
Chapter 14  Plant collecting and trading
Chapter 15  Plants and the future

Photography credits
Acknowledgements
Index
Index of scientific names 
For more information, or to order this book, please visit http://www.press.uchicago.edu
Google preview here

Chicago Manual of Style |

RSS Feed

RSS feed of the latest books from Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew. RSS Feed