Pathways to Korean Culture

Paintings of the Joseon Dynasty, 1392-1910

Burglind Jungmann

Pathways to Korean Culture

Burglind Jungmann

Distributed for Reaktion Books

304 pages | 150 color plates, 30 halftones | 7 1/2 x 9 4/5
Cloth $65.00 ISBN: 9781780233673 Published November 2014 For sale in North and South America only
The Joseon Dynasty in Korea lasted over five centuries and saw the height of classical Korean culture, leaving a lasting imprint on the attitudes and traditions of Korea today. In Pathways to Korean Culture, Burglind Jungmann provides a survey of the important developments in Korean art and visual culture during the Joseon Dynasty and introduces Joseon painting to the wider world.
           
In addition to discussing the more well-known ink paintings of the literati elite, Jungmann investigates the role of women as artists and patrons, the use of the ideals of Chinese antiquity for political purposes, and the role of painting in foreign exchange and as a means of escapism. She also explores the support of Buddhist products in a society governed by Confucian ideology and court projects done to document important events and decorate palaces. Jungmann unwraps the layers of personal, intellectual, aesthetic, religious, socio-political, and economic contexts within which these paintings are embedded, casting new light on the conditions of this period. Tying in with exhibitions at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art in June, 2014 and the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston in November, 2015, Pathways to Korean Culture fills an immense gap in the literature on this period of Korean art.
Contents

Introduction

PART I

THE EARLY JOSEON DYNASTY: NEO-CONFUCIAN

IDEALS AND STRATEGIES OF RECLUSION

One   Chinese Antiquity as an Ideal of Paradise

Two   Court Traditions and Literati Styles

Three  Women as Artists and Patrons

Four   Strategies of Reclusion

Five   Escapism and Diplomatic Exchange: Kim Myeongguk and Han Sigak

PART II

NATIVE THEMES VERSUS FOREIGN STYLE

Six  e Korean Reception of the ‘Southern School of Painting’

Seven   Between Old and New: Yun Duseo and Jo Yeongseok

Eight   e Question of ‘True Scenery’

Nine   Facets of Literati Art: Sim Sajeong and Gang Sehwang

Ten   Individualist and Eccentric: Yi Insang and Choe Buk

Eleven   Orthodoxy and Revival: From Kim Jeonghui to An Jungsik

PART III

DOCUMENTATION, DECORATION AND DISPLAY:

FROM COURT PAINTING TO FOLK ART

Twelve   Painting Production at Court

Thirteen   e Case of Kim Hongdo

Fourteen   Court Painting and Minhwa

References

Bibliography

Index of Characters

Index of Painters

Acknowledgements

Photo Acknowledgements

Index

6

Review Quotes
Arts Asiatiques
Pathways to Korean Culture is a wide-ranging synthetic analysis of the paintings of Korea’s Joseon dynasty (1392–1910), that takes a comprehensive look at its history and visual culture. The publication of this book should be welcomed by anyone who has an interest in Korean painting. . . . With masterly erudition and thorough discernment, Jungmann has written here what is certain to be the standard guide to the history of Joseon painting. . . . The best and most comprehensive overview of Joseon painting from the West to date, encouraging much thoughtful, cohesive analysis of Korean painting to follow.”
Bulletin of the School of Oriental and African Studies
“This is a valuable, original, and accessible overview of a rich and multilayered artistic tradition that is not well understood outside Korea.”
Hongnam Kim, Department of Art History, Ewha Woman’s University, Seoul, and former director of the National Museum of Korea
“Jungmann has done a marvelous job. I believe [the book] will certainly be a great contribution to the field of East Asian studies.”
Chin-Sung Chang, Seoul National University
“Of great importance in enhancing our understanding of Joseon painting and of Korean painting as a whole.”
For more information, or to order this book, please visit http://www.press.uchicago.edu
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