Personalisation

Edited by Peter Beresford

Personalisation

Edited by Peter Beresford

Distributed for Policy Press at the University of Bristol

76 pages | 5 x 7 3/4
Paper $16.00 ISBN: 9781447316145 Published April 2014 For sale in North and South America only
Personalization has become a social policy buzzword in the twenty-first century as many organizations move steadily away from one-size-fits-all models of service. In this provocative book, Peter Beresford is joined by other top academics to challenge the personalization agenda. Although critical of one-size-fits-all approaches, they contend that personalization turns service users into consumers who are shopping in a care market. This does not facilitate better attunement to user needs, they argue, but an increased commodification of care that actually channels large profits toward a decreasing number of providers at the expense of service quality. A timely debate in an era when public programs are deeply embattled, Personalisation is a careful work of critical policy assessment. 
Contents
Series Editors’
Introduction
Personalisation: from solution to problem? - Lead essay by Peter Beresford
Personalisation, participation and policy construction: a critique of influences and understandings - response by Sarah Carr
Up close and personal in Glasgow: the harmful carer, service user and workforce consequences of personalisation - response by Jim Main
Personalisation – plus ca change? - response by Alan Roulstone
The need for true person-centred support - response by Pat Stack
All in the name of personalisation - response by Helga Pile
Personalisation – is there an alternative? - response by Roddy Slorach
Personal budgets: the two-legged stool that doesn’t stand up - response by Colin Slasberg
Once more on personalisation - Concluding remarks by Peter Beresford
References
For more information, or to order this book, please visit http://www.press.uchicago.edu
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