Environmental Harm

An Eco-justice Perspective

Rob White

Rob White

Distributed for Policy Press at the University of Bristol

216 pages | 6 3/4 x 9 1/2 | © 2013
Cloth $110.00 ISBN: 9781447300403 Published October 2013 For sale in North and South America only
Challenging conventional definitions of environmental harm, this book considers the problem from an eco-justice perspective. Rob White here identifies and systematically analyzes three interconnected approaches to environmental harm: environmental justice (which focuses on harm to humans), ecological justice (which focuses on harm to the environment), and species justice (which focuses on harm to non-human animals). Examining the efforts of activists and social movements engaged in these causes, White describes the tensions between the three approaches and calls for a new eco-justice framework that will allow for the reconciliation of these differences. 
Avi Brisman, Eastern Kentucky University
“Rob White has been at the forefront of green criminology, developing frameworks of analysis for understanding ecological degradation. In this book, he blazes an important new trail, establishing a moral basis for action.”
Contents

List of tables, figures and boxes

About the author

Acknowledgements

 

Introduction

                Environmental harm and social harm approaches

                Green criminology and environmental harm

                An eco-justice perspective

                Conflicting views and moral dilemmas

 

1              Justice-based approaches to environmental harm

                Introduction

                Components of an eco-justice perspective

                Contentious concepts

                Key questions about harm

                The moral calculus: weighing up the harm

                Conclusion

 

2              Environmental justice and harm to humans

                Introduction

                Contentious concepts: environmental justice

                Social patterns of harm and risk

                Harm, place and the local

                Transborder conflicts over land

                Conclusion: measuring the value of human life

 

3              Conservation, ecological justice and harm to nature

                Introduction

                Contentious concepts: ecological justice

                Transforming nature

                Land, property and the global commons

                Conservationism and social division

                Conclusion: measuring the value of nature

 

4              Species justice and harm to animals

                Introduction

                Contentious concepts: species justice

                Categorising animals

                Crime, criminology and animals

                Animals, particular species and individuals

                Conclusion: measuring the value of animals

 

5              Toward eco-justice for all

                Introduction

                Contentious concepts: eco-justice

                Nature, species and culture

                Socio-economic context of environmental harm

                Eco-justice in practice

                Conclusion: where to from here?

 

References

Index

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