Digging Holes Abroad

An Ethnography of Dutch Archaeological Research Projects Abroad

Sjoerd van der Linde

Digging Holes Abroad

Sjoerd van der Linde

Distributed for Leiden University Press

246 pages | 8 1/5 x 10 3/4 | © 2012
Paper $65.00 ISBN: 9789087281915 Published November 2014 For sale only in the United States, its dependencies, the Philippines, and Canada
This thoroughly researched study discusses two archaeological undertakings—the Deir Alla Joint Archaeological Project in the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan and the Santa Barbara Project in Curaçao.  The author offers a critical reflection on the role and responsibility of archaeologists in relation to the values and demands of other actors in society. Digging Holes Abroad contributes to critical debates in archaeology that call for a self-reflexive, ethnographic archaeology that actively engages with community concerns.  
Contents
Chapter One: Introduction
1.1 Introduction
1.2 The social context of archaeology
1.3 Digging holes abroad
1.4 Current perspectives and their relationship with Dutch practices
1.5 An ethnographic approach to archaeological research projects abroad
1.6 A critical and reflexive account
1.7 Relevance
1.8 Structure
 
Chapter Two: An Ethnographic Approach to Archaeological Research Projects Abroad
2.1 Ethnographies of archaeology
2.2 Multivocality and community collaboration
2.2.1 Multivocality and the decolonisation of archaeological practice
2.2.2 Community and collaborative archaeology
2.3 Values and archaeological heritage management
2.4 Politics and power in archaeology
2.5 The value of discourse analysis for ethnographic research
2.5.1 Discourses
2.5.2 An ethnographic approach to policy and practice
2.6 Towards an ethnography of archaeological research projects abroad
 
Chapter Three: Asking Foreign Questions
3.1 Research approach
3.1.1. Introduction
3.1.2 Methods and analysis
3.2 Research design
3.2.1 Choice of case studies
3.2.2 Research design and fieldwork
3.3 Positionality
 
Chapter Four: The Deir Alla Joint Archaeological Project
4.1 Introduction
4.1.1 Introduction
4.1.2 Structure of chapter
4.2 Background
4.2.1 The Deir Alla Joint Archaeological Project
4.2.2 The Jordan Valley
4.2.3 Deir Alla
4.2.4 Tell Deir Alla
4.3 The Deir Alla Joint Archaeological Project
4.3.1 Perceptions of success and failure
4.3.2 Archaeological theory and practice
4.4 The Authorised Archaeological Discourse
4.4.1 The Authorised Archaeological Discourse
4.4.2 All values are equal, but some values are more equal than others
4.5 Policy negotiations
4.5.1 The translation of values
4.5.2 The Department of Antiquities
4.5.3 The (foreign) archaeologist as expert
4.5.4 The DoA and the Ministry of Tourism
4.5.5 Local perspectives
4.6 Project policy and practical outcomes
4.6.1 Introduction
4.6.2 Project representations
4.6.3 The uncertain future of the Joint Project
4.6.4 Jordanian policy negotiations: maintaining ownership and access
4.7 The role and responsibility of foreign archaeologists
 
Chapter Five: The Santa Barbara Project
5.1 Introduction
5.1.1 Introduction
5.1.2 Structure of chapter
5.2 Background
5.2.1 Curaçao
5.2.2 Dutch archaeological research in Curaçao
5.2.3 Archaeological heritage management in Curaçao
5.2.4 Santa Barbara Plantation
5.3 The Santa Barbara Project
5.3.1 The Santa Barbara Project
5.3.2 Perceptions of success and failure
5.4 The Authorised Archaeological Discourse
5.4.1 Introduction
5.4.2 Archaeological heritage as a fragile scientific resource under threat
5.4.3 The primacy of science and excavation
5.4.4 Archaeological heritage as a professional concern of the state
5.4.5 Participation and education as to advance research and protection
5.5 Project policy negotiations and the translation of values
5.5.1 Alternative values and discourses
5.5.2 Policy negotiations and the translation of values
5.5.3 Mechanisms of exclusion
5.5.4 Project benefits
5.6 Project policy and practical outcomes
5.6.1 The (re-)production of heritage values and discourses
5.6.2 Policy, practice and access
5.6.3 Project contextualisation
5.7 The role and responsibility of archaeologists
 
Chapter Six: Digging Holes Abroad
6.1 Introduction
6.2 Archaeological values and discourses
6.3 Project negotiations
6.4 Policy and practice
6.5 Concluding thoughts
 
Appendix
References
Abbreviations and Acronyms
List of Figures and Tables
Dutch and English Summary
Acknowledgements
Curriculum Vitae
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