Cosmic Shift

Russian Contemporary Art Writing

Ilya and Emilia Kabakov, et al.

Cosmic Shift

Ilya and Emilia Kabakov, et al.

Distributed for Zed Books

With a Foreword by Bart Da Baere
456 pages | 60 halftones | 6 x 9 | © 2017
Paper $30.00 ISBN: 9781786993243 Published October 2017 For sale in North and South America only
Russia looms large in our global consciousness, but most of its presence is felt politically instead of artistically. While Moscow is the largest city in Europe, its contemporary and modern art has been largely passed over. Editors Ilya and Emilia Kabakov have set out to change this with Cosmic Shift, the first anthology of Russian art writing to be published outside of Russia.
The country’s most prominent contemporary artists, writers, philosophers, curators, and historians come together to examine the region’s various movements of contemporary art, culture, and theory. With contributions from Barte de Baere, Boris Groys, Anton Vidokle, Bogdan Mamonov, Pavel Pepperstein, Dimitri Prigov, and Maria Sumnina, among many others, this definitive collection reveals a compelling portrait of a vast and complex nation built on a contradicting dialectic between the material and the ideal and a culture battling its own histories and ideologies.
Contents
Foreword- Bart De Baere
Acknowledgements- Elena Zaytseva
Part One
Past Futures
1 Keti Chukhrov
The nomadic theater of the communist
2 Ilya and Emilia Kabakov
The center of cosmic energy
3 Boris Groys
The Truth of art
4 Andrey Monastyrsky
VDNKh, the capital of the world
5 Anton Vidokle
The Communist Revolution was caused by the Sun
Part Two
Inherited aesthetics
6 Joseph Backstein
History of angels
7 Dmitry Gutov and Anatoly Osmolovsky
Concerning abstractionism
8 Olga Chernysheva
Screens
9 Dmitry Prigov
Two manifestos
10 Maria Chehonadskih
The form of art as mediation
11 Artemy Magun
Soviet communism and the paradox of alienation
12 Alexander Brener
The Russian avant-garde as an uncontrollable beast
Part Three
From the archive
13 Vadim Zakharov
Author, cosmos, archive
14 Bogdan Mamonov
A binary system
15 Maria Kapajeva
You can call him another man
16 Andrey Kuzkin
Running to the nest
17 Masha Sumnina
Brink, kerbside, fence, margin
Part Four
Russia, today
18 Ilya Budraitskis
A heritage without an heir
19 Dmitry Venkov
Krisis
20 Gleb Napreenko
Questions without answers, answers without questions
21 Gluklya (Natalia Pershina-Yakimanskaya)
The Utopian Union of the Unemployed
22 Dmitry Vilensky
Chto Delat? And method
23 Yevgeny Granilshchikov
Weakness
Part Five
Future futures
24 Oxana Timofeeva
Ultra black
25 Arseny Zhilyaev
Demand full automation of contemporary art
26 Alex Anikina
The Antichthon
27 Ivan Novikov
I want to be afraid of the forest
28 Pavel Pepperstein
The skyscraper-cleaner pine marten
 
About the contributors
Text credits
Image credits
Index
 
Review Quotes
John Bowlt, Director, Institute of Modern Russian Culture
"Theory and practice are brought together with clarity and conviction in this powerful selection of aesthetic statements."
Gilda Williams, author of How to Write about Contemporary Art
“Zaytseva and Anikina’s comprehensive anthology illuminates the constellation of Russian art across realism and fantasy, Communism and Cosmism, orthodoxy and perpetual revolution.”
Peter Osborne, author of Anywhere or Not at All: Philosophy of Contemporary Art
“Cosmism is the lure, when a revived mysticism is the order of the day. But this collection is more energetically eclectic than that. It provides a window into three generations of artists and critics—Soviet, Post-Soviet, and today.”
Alena Ledeneva, Director, UCL FRINGE Centre
“Fascinating! More proof of the continued vibrancy of Russian art: modern, postmodern or cosmic, despite the fringe ideas increasingly becoming mainstream.”
Kate Fowle, Chief Curator, Garage Museum of Contemporary Art, Moscow
“Long overdue, this anthology is the first to reveal the idiosyncratic and singular perspectives of leading contemporary artists from Russia. Together, the texts offer a portrait of creative resistance from what Bart de Baere calls ‘the virtually invisible center of the world’.”
Ekaterina Degot, Alexander Rodchenko School of Photography and New Media, Moscow
“A fascinating collection of essays, full of stimulating paradoxes, which perfectly reflects the intensity of debate on the contemporary Russian art scene, as precarious in everyday life as it is majestic in its cosmic dreams.”
Andrew Jack, journalist for the Financial Times
“An excellent initiative to shed light in the English-speaking world on Russian writing about and by contemporary artists. It will help give them a broader audience and spark important cross-cultural debate.”
For more information, or to order this book, please visit http://www.press.uchicago.edu
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