Competition for Prisons

Public or Private?

Julian Le Vay

Competition for Prisons

Julian Le Vay

Distributed for Bristol University Press

232 pages | 6 x 9 | © 2015
Paper $42.95 ISBN: 9781447313229 Published March 2016 For sale in North and South America only
A quarter of a century has passed since the Thatcher government launched one of its most controversial reforms: privately run prisons. This book offers an assessment of the successes and failures of that initiative, comparing public and private prisons, analyzing the possible and claimed benefits of competition, and looking closely at how well the government has managed the unusual quasi-market that the privatization push created. Drawing on first-person interviews with key players and his own experience working in prison finance, Julian Le Vay presents the most valuable look yet at the results of prison privatization for government, citizens, and prisoners.
Contents
List of tables and figures
List of acronyms
Preface
1. Origins
2. Evolution
3. Related markets: immigration-two sectors, no competition 
4. Youth custody
5. Related markets: electronic monitoring-fall of the giants
6. The quasi-market: characteristics and operation
7. Comparing public and contracted prisons
8. Comparing quality of service
Insert: Four prisons in trouble
9. Costing the uncostable? Civil Service pensions
10. Costing the uncostable? PFI
11. Comparing cost
12. Impact of competition on the public sector
13. Objections of principle
14. Related markets: probation-how not to do it
15. Has competition worked?
16. Has competition a future?
Appendix: Prescription of operation procedures in prison contracts
Bibliography
Index
 
Review Quotes
Sir Martin Narey, first CEO of National Offender Management Service and adviser to the UK Secretary of State for Justice
“This is an intelligent, challenging analysis demonstrating very clearly what has been lost—in terms of making prisons more effective and more humane, by the abandonment of competition. Much the best history of the period I’ve read.”
Philip Wheatley CB, former director-general of the National Offender Management Service and former director-general of HM Prison Service
“A fascinating book relevant to all interested in politics. Its superb analysis of the development of private sector prisons provides an excellent case-study demonstrating the weaknesses of our political system.”
John Tizard | JohnTizard.com
“Produces some fascinating insights. . . . Le Vay’s work raises many of the issues that a wider enquiry needs to address and attempt to find answers to.”
On Probation Blog
“Le Vay uses his former role as finance director of the Prison Service to give a wholly new analysis of comparative costs and of the impact of constant changes in competition policy.”
For more information, or to order this book, please visit http://www.press.uchicago.edu
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