Changing Children's Services

Working and Learning Together, Second Edition

Edited by Pam Foley and Andy Rixon

Edited by Pam Foley and Andy Rixon

Distributed for Policy Press at the University of Bristol

288 pages | 24 color plates, 2 figures, 6 tables | 7 1/2 x 9 1/2 | © 2014
Paper $34.95 ISBN: 9781447313793 Published April 2014 For sale in North and South America only
Changing Children’s Services examines the fundamental changes that children’s services have been undergoing in the United Kingdom in the context of the drive toward increasingly integrated ways of working. The contributors critically examine the potential and realities of closer integration and ask whether these new ways of working are truly more effective in responding to the needs and aspirations of children and their families. They also explore the experiences of working in constantly changing environments and their effects on practitioners and clients. This fully updated second edition offers a new introduction with a helpful overview of current key issues and new case studies to illustrate the realities of practice today. 
Denny Hevey, University of Northampton

"Multi-agency working is one of the biggest challenges facing Children's Services today. This book not only explain the issues effectively, drawing upon a variety of theoretical, professional and research perspectives, but also gives clear pointers as to how practice in working together can be improved."

Contents

Introduction

 

Working with change

Andy Rixon

 

Towards integrated working

Bill Stone and Pam Foley

 

Parenting, practice and politics

Steve Leverett

 

Interagency working with children and families: what works and what makes a difference?

Nick Frost

 

Learning together

Andy Rixon

 

Children’s services: the changing workplace?

Nick Frost

 

Acknowledgements

 

Index

For more information, or to order this book, please visit http://www.press.uchicago.edu
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