Cloth $75.00 ISBN: 9780938903420 Published June 2009

Barbara Crane

Challenging Vision

By Barbara Crane, with Essays by John Rohrbach and Abigail Foerstner

By Barbara Crane, with Essays by John Rohrbach and Abigail Foerstner

Distributed for Chicago Department of Cultural Affairs

With an Introduction by Kenneth C. Burkhart
252 pages | 293 color plates and halftones | 12 x 11 | © 2009
Cloth $75.00 ISBN: 9780938903420 Published June 2009

Barbara Crane’s subjects are commonplace: a piece of driftwood, a cluster of wild mushrooms, a crowd of commuters rushing for the train. The resulting photographs, however, are far from ordinary. They are imaginative, peculiar, jarring, and, like their creator, defy easy explanation.

 

 For more than sixty years, Crane has forged her own path as a photographer. Lacking a darkroom, she began using Polaroid materials. Lacking suitable models, she paid her children to pose. Barbara Crane: Challenging Vision celebrates this Chicagoan’s wide-ranging art with a gorgeous collection of more than 250 color and black and white photographs.

 

“Once I developed my first role of film in 1948,” Crane notes, “nothing else mattered.” Spanning the breadth of her career, from early studies of the human form to long narrow landscapes evoking Asian scrolls; from silver gelatin and platinum prints to present-day digital works, it is by far the largest and most definitive overview of her work to date. Replete with a critical analysis by John Rohrbach and a biographical essay by Abigail Foerstner, it will delight and challenge anyone interested in contemporary photography.

Contents
Foreword, by Gregory G. Knight
 
Introduction, by Kenneth C. Burkhart
 
Seeing Life Differently
   John Rohrbach
 
Plates
 
On the Path to the Perfect Photograph
   Abigail Foerstner
 
Chronology
   Lynne Brown
 
Acknowledgments
For more information, or to order this book, please visit http://www.press.uchicago.edu
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