Cloth $90.00 ISBN: 9780226853505 Published July 2012
Paper $31.00 ISBN: 9780226853512 Published July 2012
E-book $7.00 to $30.00 About E-books ISBN: 9780226853529 Published June 2012

Theater of the Mind

Imagination, Aesthetics, and American Radio Drama

Neil Verma

Neil Verma

296 pages | 8 halftones, 13 line drawings, 1 table | 6 x 9 | © 2012
Cloth $90.00 ISBN: 9780226853505 Published July 2012
Paper $31.00 ISBN: 9780226853512 Published July 2012
E-book $7.00 to $30.00 About E-books ISBN: 9780226853529 Published June 2012

For generations, fans and critics have characterized classic American radio drama as a “theater of the mind.” This book unpacks that characterization by recasting the radio play as an aesthetic object within its unique historical context. In Theater of the Mind, Neil Verma applies an array of critical methods to more than six thousand recordings to produce a vivid new account of radio drama from the Depression to the Cold War.

In this sweeping exploration of dramatic conventions, Verma investigates legendary dramas by the likes of Norman Corwin, Lucille Fletcher, and Wyllis Cooper on key programs ranging from The Columbia Workshop, The Mercury Theater on the Air, and Cavalcade of America to Lights Out!, Suspense, and Dragnet to reveal how these programs promoted and evolved a series of models of the imagination.

With close readings of individual sound effects and charts of broad trends among formats, Verma not only gives us a new account of the most flourishing form of genre fiction in the mid-twentieth century but also presents a powerful case for the central place of the aesthetics of sound in the history of modern experience.

 

Society for Cinema and Media Studies: SCMS-Best First Book Award
Won

View Recent Awards page for more award winning books.
Journal of American Studies
“Any scholar or critic invested in the soundscapes and cultures of postwar media within or without the US—cinema, radio, television, print, and even such post-postwar audiovisual media as the home computer and the smartphone—must hereafter contend with the concepts so richly developed in Theater of the Mind.”
Michele Hilmes | University of Wisconsin–Madison
“Theater of the Mind does more to reanimate the study of radio forms and structures—indeed, of sound art in general—than any work published in recent memory. Neil Verma's exploration of audio narratives and sonic techniques during radio drama's heyday opens up a vast body of creative work that has been shut off from serious contemplation for decades. It is an important intervention in the growing field of sound studies, not to be missed.”
Tom Gunning | University of Chicago
“While most scholars have explored radio in terms of broadcasting music or journalism, Neil Verma explores the medium’s neglected but very popular dramas. In this detailed analysis, he reveals how radio, from the thirties through the fifties dramatized the conflicts of the Depression and New Deal and the paranoia of the fifties. By constructing a “theater of the mind,” radio used sound and narrative structure to tell the nation’s stories, encompassing social transformation and psychological perspective.”
 

Jonathan Sterne | author of The Audible Past: Cultural Origins of Sound Reproduction
“Neil Verma’s Theater of the Mind is a gift in an age when so many have forgotten the depth of radio’s contribution to sonic culture. Verma rethinks sound as a creative medium in the past and in the present, offering a definitive account of radio drama in the 20th century. His spatial readings of these dramas and their listeners—supported by fresh concepts like audioposition and kaleidasonic space—promise to transform the ways in which we analyze creative audio. Theater of the Mind is a major work of radio history.”
Contents
Acknowledgments
Introduction: What Is the “Theater of the Mind”?
Part 1   Radio Aesthetics in the Late Depression, 1937–1945
1 Dramas of Space and Time
2 Producing Perspective in Radio
3 Intimate and Kaleidosonic Styles
4 Norman Corwin’s People’s Radio
Part 2   Communication and Interiority in 1940s Radio, 1941–1950
5 Honeymoon Shocker
6 Dramas of Susceptibility and Transmission
7 Eavesdropper, Ventriloquist, Signalman
Part 3   Radio and the Postwar Mood, 1945–1955
8 Later than You Think?
9 Just the Facts
10 In Trials
Coda: Instruction and Excavation
Guide to Radio Programs
Notes
Index
For more information, or to order this book, please visit http://www.press.uchicago.edu
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